Beak Street

11 - 29 May 2010

by Greg Freeman
Based on a painting 'Sicilian Cats' by Ian Heath

TIME OUT CRITICS’ CHOICE FOR BEAK STREET

‘Freeman’s script is a compelling, kitsch-free morality play that perhaps verges on out and out homage to film noir’s golden age, but gains an oblique, occasionally comic frisson from, y’know, being about cats.’
– Time Out
★★★★

After the Time Out No1 Critics’ Choice success of Doig! at the Tabard Theatre last September we are proud to present Greg Freeman’s latest work Beak Street, a surreal wonderful world inhabited by cats.

‘Theatre that from concept to execution is utterly bonkers but quite brilliant’
– Time Out on Doig!

In the world of ‘noir’ shadows, mean streets and gangster cats, only one thing is really certain, cats, they ain’t known for their loyalty. So when his prize fighting mouse disappears in mysterious circumstances, the Beak Street Cat knows he was screwed over.

Bankrupt, humbled, deserted by his gang, he sets out to regain his power and nail the cat who betrayed him. Blood will be shed, friendships tested, but ultimately the Beak Street Cat will uncover the truth, and like the fur ball from hell, it will be hard for him to swallow.

It’s a story of dog eat dog in a cat world.

Greg Freeman edited and adapted the only ever successful version of an American Sitcom Who’s the Boss which became The Upper Hand (ITV). Since the turn of the century, he has developed a career in the theatre including Last Bus to Paradise, Underbelly (co-wrote and winner of the London New Play Festival), Take (Old Red Lion), Kathmandu (Menier Chocolate Factory and Pleasance Edinburgh), and Wake Up and Smell the Coffee (New End Theatre).

Beak Street is directed by Ken McClymont, the former Artistic Director of The Old Red Lion Theatre. Whilst there he directed over thirty premieres include: Waiting for the Angels, Murder In Bridgport, Diaspora Jigs and Life After Life. Revivals include: A Chaste Maid In Cheapside (Old Red Lion) and The Slab Boys (Old Red Lion) which won Best Production of a Comedy Award (LFA). In 1989-90 he won an Outstanding Contribution to Fringe Theatre Award for programming of an exceptional standard at the Old Red Lion.